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Temecula, CA
The City That Shines Through The Mist
Area Code: 951 - Zip Code: 92592

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LOCAL EVENTS
Temecula Valley Museum
Old Town Community Theater
Old Town Chapel
Temecula Polo Club
Temecula Ice Skating
Temecula Wine & Music Festival
Temecula Wine Country
Pennypickle's Museum
Temecula Farmer's Market
Old Town Temecula
Old Town Temecula Restaurants
Visit Temecula Valley
Temecula Greek Festival
Pechanga Casino
Temecula Balloon and Wine Festival
Temecula Promenade Mall
In 1904 Walter L. Vail, bought 38,000 acres (154 km2) of Rancho Temecula and Rancho Pauba, along with the northern half of Rancho Little Temecula. In 1915, the first paved, two-lane county road was built through Temecula.
Temecula Polo Club
The Temecula Valley Polo Clubs mission is to provide polo events to serve local non-profit organizations, to hold fundraisers to further serve their mission and help raise funds for their important causes.. More...
Since 1993 Temecula maintains international relations with two cities, Leidschendam-Voorburg in the Netherlands and Daisen, Tottori in Japan. More info...
























Temecula, CA Jobs

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Old Town Temecula

Welcome to historic Old Town Temecula. Shop among historic buildings from the latter half of the 1800s, which now serve as home for antique shops, community theater, museum, galleries, winery shops, and many specialty stores. Eat at many top restaurants, enjoy live music and family entertainment every week at some of Temecula's weekly festivals. Temecula has something for everyone. - More


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TOP NEWS

SPORTS NEWS


Study Finds Benefit of Cheerleading
Study Finds Benefit of CheerleadingCould cheerleading be the most progressive sport in terms of gender roles? New research from the University of East Anglia indicates that the traditionally female-centered activity can help participants of both sexes challenge stereotypes about girls in sports. The study, which was published in the journal Sport in Society: Cultures, Commerce, Media, Politics, tracked the growing popularity of cheerleading in the U.K. and focused on the members of four cheerleading teams. “The participants in our study talked about flipping gender norms in cheerleading,” Dr. Amy Pressland, a co-author of the study, tells Yahoo Parenting.

World's Longest Bicycle Spans 117-Feet—Half a City Block!
World's Longest Bicycle Spans 117-Feet—Half a City Block!Clear the streets! Dutch cycling group Mijl Van Mares Werkploeg just broke the 2016 world record for longest bicycle.  At a whopping 117 feet long, the bike stretches half a city block and spans farther than the word’s longest limo, at 100 feet long. Per Guinness World Record’s requirements, it has just two wheels and is actually operable. The bike stretches half a city block. (Photo: Guinness World Records) In the video, Mara Montalbano shows us how it rides.

ECONOMY NEWS


Seven Earth-sized planets orbit an alien star only 40 light-years away
Seven Earth-sized planets orbit an alien star only 40 light-years awayA small, cool star in distant space plays host to something amazing.  Scientists have discovered that at least seven Earth-sized worlds circle the star TRAPPIST-1, a ultracool dwarf star only about 40 light-years (235 trillion miles) from Earth.  The planetary haul — which includes at least six rocky planets total, three of which were first discovered last year — is detailed in a new study published in the journal Nature on Wednesday.  SEE ALSO: Stop describing a planet as 'Earth-like' unless it really is This marks the first time so many Earth-sized worlds have been found orbiting the same star.  It's possible that some of those exoplanets (worlds orbiting stars outside of our solar system) could play host to liquid water on their surfaces, boosting the chance that alien life might be lurking there.  "We can expect that within a few years we will know a lot more about these planets," Amaury Triaud, a co-author of the new study said during a press conference, adding that if there is life on one of these worlds, we could find it within a decade.  Before you go running off to plan your trip to TRAPPIST-1, it's important to remember that the system isn't exactly an analogue to our own. A star system like Jupiter The best way to think about TRAPPIST-1 and its worlds is to compare it to Jupiter and its many moons. Just like Jupiter's moons, the planets orbiting TRAPPIST-1 all interact with one another, meaning that their orbits are influenced by one another.  The seven planets in the system closely orbit their star, so that if TRAPPIST-1 were in place of our sun in the solar system, the planets surrounding it would all be within the orbit of Mercury, according to the study's authors. The planets are thought to be tidally locked to their star, meaning that, like the moon, the same sides of the exoplanets' faces always point toward the host star. If you were to stand on the surface of one of the planets, the salmon-colored star would look about 200 times dimmer than our own sun, giving off about the same amount of light as our star does at the tail end of a sunset, Triaud said. Artist's representation of the planets around TRAPPIST-1. Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech "The spectacle would be beautiful because every now and then, you would see another planet — maybe about as big as twice the moon — in the sky depending on which planet you're on and which planet you look at," Triaud said. A special solar system Because the star system is so close (in cosmic terms) to Earth, it's ideal for any scientist hoping to check out these worlds for themselves, and they already have. The same team behind this Nature study announced the discovery of three planets orbiting TRAPPIST-1 in May 2016.  Since then, the researchers did many followup observations on the system to try to better characterize the planets orbiting the faint star light-years from home.  The new study details the four other planets orbiting the star using multiple ground-based telescopes and NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.  Scientists used the transit method to find the exoplanets, meaning that they had to wait for the worlds to pass in front of their star, causing a dip in the light of the dwarf star. Because the orbits of each planet influence the others, such observations also allowed the researchers to ascertain the masses and diameters of the planets, Triaud said. The planets orbiting TRAPPIST-1 compared to worlds in our solar system. Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech The fact that they transit their star also means that scientists will be able to do plenty of followup observations that will characterize the atmospheres of the worlds thanks to the light shining on them from the star.  "This is just the neatest system," NASA exoplanet scientist Steve Howell, who is not affiliated with the new study, said in an interview. "While there was much hoopla about the Proxima Centauri planet — well, okay, that's cool too, don't get me wrong — that planet doesn't transit, and so there just won't be a lot of followup work you can do on that planet."  Hunting for life It's still unclear whether or not life exists on any of these worlds. All of the planets are far enough from their star that they could conceivably host liquid water on their surfaces, according to the researchers. Four of the worlds in particular are thought to be in the "habitable zone" of the star, which means they could be our best chances for life outside the solar system. However, none of this is a sure thing. Figuring out the habitable zone of a dwarf star isn't exactly easy. Because TRAPPIST-1 and stars of its ilk are much smaller and dimmer than our sun, it's unclear exactly where the habitable zone lies.  We have a relatively good understanding of the habitable zone around sunlike stars, but ultracool dwarfs are trickier, in part because they are very active in their early days, possibly stripping worlds that would be in the habitable zones of their atmospheres. That said, these stars do live a long time, possibly allowing advanced life time to evolve on worlds surrounding stars like TRAPPIST-1, which is thought to be at least 500 million years old.  Follow ups a-plenty The Hubble Space Telescope characterized the atmospheres of TRAPPIST-1B and TRAPPIST-1C, finding that the two worlds probably aren't encircled by hydrogen and helium rich atmospheres, meaning their atmospheres could resemble our own.  Researchers will be able to get an even better look at these worlds in the future. NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) — Hubble's telescope successor expected to launch in 2018 — should be able to peer deeply into the atmospheres of alien planets to try to see if they really could be like our own.  By learning more about the atmospheres enveloping on these worlds, it's possible that we'll be able to figure out if we are alone in the universe.  The JWST might be able to pick out oxygen, carbon dioxide, methane and other molecules in exoplanet atmospheres to find any biosignatures that might be present.  While there isn't a silver bullet molecule that indicates whether life is definitely present on an alien world, certain elements could give scientists pause if found in a planet's atmosphere.  If, for example, JWST found "molecular oxygen, or if it found carbon compounds that on the Earth we assign to pollution — like burning of fossil fuels — that would be pretty cool," Howell said. "Those would be things that you'd have to scratch your head and say, 'wow, that would be a pretty good sign.'" BONUS: Could massive solar 'superflares' help us find life on other planets?

Police release audio of suspect in Indiana girls' deaths
Police release audio of suspect in Indiana girls' deathsDELPHI, Ind. (AP) — A teenage girl turned her cellphone on and recorded a man saying "down the hill" before she and a friend were killed along a northern Indiana hiking trail last week, authorities said Wednesday.
   

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Welcome to Temecula - "The city that shines through the mist". One of Southern California's premier destinations. A city rich in history, natural beauty, rolling hills, picturesque vineyards and expansive views of the San Jacinto mountains make it a favorite destination for thousands of visitors.

In the 1700's The Shoshone indians made the Temecula Valley their home. They call it, "Exva Temeeku". Later the Spanish interpreted and spelled the word as "Temecula" and called the Indians living in the region as "Luiseos".

The first known European to discover the valley was Father Juan Norberto de Santiago, in October 1797, while seeking a site for a new mission. Temecula was one of the stops on the route of the Butterfield Stage and in 1859 became the location of the seventh post office in California. The first post office was in San Francisco.

In 1904, Walter Vail bought 87,500 acres (four Spanish land grants) and drove 1,000 head of cattle from Arizona. It was the last large cattle drive in the United States. It remained a working cattle ranch for the next 60 years. in 1882, when the Santa Fe Railway came through our valley, Old Town Temecula was born.

Many famous people "passed this way" including mountain men like Jedediah Smith, Indian scout Kit Carson and authors Helen Hunt Jackson and Erle Stanley Gardner that have had two Temecula schools name after them.

Temecula has approximately 100,000 residents. With neighboring Murrieta, on the northwest and the Pechanga Indian Reservation on the south, Temecula forms the southwestern anchor of the Inland Empire region. The city is almost equidistant to San Diego, Los Angeles, and Orange County. The I-15 corridor between Los Angeles County and San Diego was completed in the early 1980's and the subdivision land boom began.

Temecula was incorporated in December, 1989. Developers tried to change the name to Rancho California, but citizens voted to officially name the city "Temecula".



 
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